erasmus

The U&T project is financed by Erasmus +

KA2 - "Cooperation for Innovation and the Exchange of Good Practices Strategic Partnerships for vocational education and training" under the supervision of the European Comission

Compendium of Knowledge EUPALT

Library of Useful information on the following topics:

This resource is available from the EUPALT project databse.

Library of Useful information on the following topics:

1.   Knowledge and understanding of dyslexia & specific learning difficultyInclude:

Name of the article:

Cerebral lateralization in schizophrenia and dyslexia: neuromagnetic responses to auditory stimuli

Short content:

This study describes cerebral correlation (related to lateralisation) inpatients with schizophrenia and persons with dyslexiaAuthor:Heim S, Kissler J, Elbert T, Rockstroh

Language:

English

Source:

http://kops.uni-konstanz.de/bitstream/handle/123456789/10840/Heim_et_al_SZ-DYS04.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

Name of the article:

Dyslexia and the Brain: What Does Current Research Tell Us?

Short content:

Defintion of dyslexiaUnderlying characteristics of dyslexiaHelp for teachersAuthor:Roxanne F. Hudson, Leslie High, and Stephanie Al Otaiba (2007)

Language:

English

Source:

http://www.ldonline.org/article/14907

Name of the article:

Dyslexic Children have abnormal brain lactate; Response to reading relatedlanguage tasks

Short content:

Study of Brain lactate metabolism in correlation with dyslexia Author:Todd L. Richards; Stephen R. Dager; David Corina; Sandra Serafini et. al1999

Language:

English

Source:

http://www.ajnr.org/content/ajnr/20/8/1393.full.pdf

Name of the article:

The brain basis of the phonological deficit in dyslexia is independent of IQ

Short content:

Study about the correlation of findings by means of functional MRI anddyslexiaAuthor:Tanaka, H.; Black, JM.; Hulme, C.; Stanley, LM.; Kesler, 2011

Language:

English

Source:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110928180414.htm

Name of the article:

Sensitivity to visual and auditory stimuli in children with developmentaldyslexia

Short content:

The paper studies auditory the correlation between visual sequences ofstimuli and the speed of their reactions.Children with dyslexia appeared slower than controls.Author:King, B.; Wood, C.; Faulkner, D., 2007

Language:

English

Source:

http://www.academia.edu/425657/Sensitivity_to_Visual_and_Auditory_Stimuli_in_Children_with_Developmental_Dyslexia

Name of the article:

Categorical perception of speech sounds and dyslexia

Short content:

The paper examines the importance of speech perception in children withdyslexiaAuthor:Serniclaes, W.; Sprenger-Charolles, L. , 2003

Language:

English

Source:

http://cpl.revues.org/379

Name of the article:

Early motor development and later language and reading skills in childrenat risk of familial dyslexia

Short content:

Children with familial risk of dyslexia and slow motor development showena smaller vocabulary with poorer inflectional skills than the other children.Author:Viholainen, H.; Ahonen, T.; Lyytinen, P.; Cantell, M.; Tolvanen, A.,2007

Language:

English

Source:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1017/S001216220600079X/pdf

Name of the article:

Motor impairment in dyslexia: the influence of attention disorders

Short content:

The study revealed was not in favor of a unequivocal causal link betweenreading disabilities and motor or ADHD.Author:

Language:

English

Source:

http://www.resodys.org/IMG/pdf/article_chaix07.pdf

Name of the article:

Fine motor coordination of students with dyslexia and attention deficitdisorder with hyperactivity

Short content:

The study shows delays in fine motor behaviour in children with ADHD anddyslexiaAuthor:Paolo Matiko Martins et al, 2011

Language:

Portuguese

Source:

http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?pid=S1516-18462011000500012&script=sci_abstract

Name of the article:

Social and emotional problems related to Dyslexia

Short content:

Paper of the International Dyslexia Association (IDA) 2004Author:Ryan, M

Language:

English

Source:

https://dyslexiaida.org/

Name of the article:

The Effectiveness of the Intervention Program on Reading Fluency andReading Motivation of Students with Dyslexia

Short content:

The study examines the impact of an intervention program with significantdifferences between intervention group and controls.Author:Mihandoost, Z.,2011

Language:

English

Source:

http://www.ccsenet.org/journal/index.php/ass/article/view/9740/6998

Name of the article:

Kleine, aber feine Literaturauswahl

Short content:

Kleine,aber feine Literaturauswahl aus dem deutschsprachigen RaumAuthor:Michael Kalmar

Language:

German

Source:

http://www.dyslexia-project.eu/rpool/resources/Eine%20kleine,%20aber%20feine%20Literatur auswahl.doc

Name of the article:

AKADEMİDİSLEKSİ İZMİR

Short content:

Disleksi: Yazılan kelimeleri okumada ve anlamada güçlük olarakalgılanabilir. Çocuk okul çağına geldiğinde okumada zorluk yaşamasıyla anlaşılabilir.- Okuma yavaştır ve akıcı değildir bazen hiç yoktur. Harf harf okur, özellikle bilmediği kelimeleri okurken duraklar, okuyamaz.- Kelimeleri kısaltarak okur.- Tahmin ederek okur.- Yüksek sesle okurken ritim ve tonlaması bozuktur, yanlış vurgulamayapar.- Okuduğu öykünün veya parçanın anlamını çıkaramz.- Bir satırı takip edemez, karıştırı, satır başına geçerken zorlan Author:Akademidisleksi

Language:

Turkish

Source:

http://www.akademidisleksi.com/

Name of the article:

YA ÇOCUĞUM OKUYAMAZSA

Short content:

Akademidisleksi izmirAuthor:

Language:

Turkish

Source:

http://www.tavsiyeediyorum.com/makale_3155.htm

2.   GENERAL BACKGROUND KNOWLEDGE:

Name of the article:

Reading and dyslexia in different orthographies. (2010). Hove :Psychology Press

Short content:

The development of reading skills in different orthographies;developmental dyslexia in different orthographies; neuroimaging studies of reading in different orthographies.Author:Edited by Nicola Brunswick, Siné McDougall and Paul de Mornay Davis

Language:

English

Source:

http://www.dyslexia-project.eu/rpool/resources/Reading%20and%20dyslexia%20in%20differe nt%20orthographies.pdf

Name of the article:

Comparison of Pen and Keyboard Transcription Modes in Children withand without Learning Disabilities.

Short content:

Fourth graders with learning disabilities in transcription (handwriting andspelling), LD-TD, and without LD-TD (non- LD), were compared on three writing tasks, which differed by level of language, when writing by pen and by keyboard. Students in both groups tended to show the same pattern of results for amount written as a larger sample of typically developing fourth graders who composed longer essays by pen. Results for that sample, which also included typically developing second and sixth graders, showed that effects of transcription mode vary with level of language and within level of language by grade level for letters and sentences. From second to fourth to sixth grade, children wrote longer essays with faster word production rate by pen than by keyboard. In addition, fourth and sixth graders wrote more complete sentences when writing by pen than by keyboard, and this relative advantage for sentence composing in text was not affected by spelling ability.Author:Beminger, V., W., Abbott, R. D., Augsburger, A., Garcia, N

Language:

English

Source:

http://www.dyslexia-project.eu/rpool/resources/+5.pdf

Name of the article:

A comparison of keyboarded and handwritten compositions and therelationship with transcription speed. (2007).

Short content:

It is well established that handwriting fluency constrains writing quality bylimiting resources for higher order processes such as planning and reviewing. According to the ‘simple view of writing’ then slow keyboarding speed should hinder the quality of keyboarded essay compositions in the same way that slow handwriting hinders handwritten essay compositions. Aim - to examine the relationship between handwriting fluency and keyboarding fluency throughout the primary school and studying the link between word-processed compositional quality and keyboarding fluency.There was a high correlation between handwriting and keyboarding speed and handwriting speed was consistently faster thankeyboarding speed across all ages. Small minority of children in years 5 and6 had faster keyboarding than handwriting speed. Results showed that children’s compositional quality was superior in the handwritten scripts as opposed to the keyboarded scripts. Writing by keyboard does not necessarily leadAuthor:Connelly, V., Gee, D., Walsh, E.

Language:

English

Source:

http://www.dyslexia-project.eu/rpool/resources/+3.pdf

Name of the article:

SeeWord—a personal word processing environment for dyslexic computerusers.

Short content:

SeeWord is a highly configurable word processing environment, whichassists dyslexic users when producing and reading text. The software was developed using a user-centred development cycle where user feedback contributed to each revision. Evaluations showed that users were able to find individualised combinations of settings using the specialised software, which they used in preference to the black-on-white text that is usually displayed on computer monitors. Three separate prototypes of the software were developed and evaluated. The third prototype was used in an experimental study with 6 dyslexic school pupils. The research showed that 5 out of the 6 dyslexic users aged 14–16 years benefited from the use of specialised software when reading text from a computer screen. Participants were able to read standard texts from a screen significantly more accurately with the aid of SeeWord. All participants reported that they felt they could read text from the screen better using the softwAuthor:Gregor, P., Dickinson, A., Macaffer, A., Andreasen, P.

Language:

English

Source:

http://www.dyslexia-project.eu/rpool/resources/+1.pdf

Name of the article:

Computer-based Programs in Speech Therapy of Dyslalia and Dyslexia-Dysgraphia. (2010). Brain, Broad Research in Artificial Intelligence andNeuroscience, 1 (2), 52-63.

Short content:

Elaboration and use of computer programs in speech disorders therapy.The objective of this study -to evaluate the therapeutic effectiveness of computer-based programs for the Romanian language in speech therapy. Along the study, we will present the experimental research throughassessing the effectiveness of computer programs in the speech therapy for speech disorders: dyslalia, dyslexia and dysgraphia. Methodologically, the use of the computer in the therapeutic phases was carried out with the help of some computer-based programs that we elaborated and we experimented with during several years of therapeutic activity. The study hypotheses verified whether the results, obtained by the subjects within the experimental group, improved significantly after using the computer- based program, compared to the subjects within the control group, whodid not use this program but got a classical therapy. The hypotheses wereconfirmed for the speech disorders included in this research; the conclusAuthor:Tobolcea, I., Danubianu, M.

Language:

English

Source:

http://www.dyslexia-project.eu/rpool/resources/+11.pdf

Name of the article:

The Effects of Audiobooks on the Psychosocial Adjustment of Pre-adolescents and Adolescents with Dyslexia.

Short content:

The objective of the present research study was to understand whatbenefits the use of audiobooks (both school-books and books of various genres, recorded on digital media) could bring to preadolescents and adolescents with developmental dyslexia. Two groups, each consisting of20 adolescents, were compared. The experimental group used theaudiobooks, while the control group continued to use normal books. After5 months of experimental training, the experimental group showed a significant improvement in reading accuracy, with reduced unease and emotional–behavioural disorders, as well as an improvement in school performance and a greater motivation and involvement in school activities. Keyword: dyslexia; audiobooks; psychosocial adjustment; adolescentsAuthor:Milani, A., Lorusso, M. L.,Molteni, M.

Language:

English

Source:

http://www.dyslexia-project.eu/rpool/resources/+23.pdf

Name of the article:

Assistive Technology for Students with Learning Disabilities in Writing:Beliefs, Knowledge and Use

Short content:

The purpose of this study was to investigate special education teacherbeliefs, knowledge and use of assistive technology for students with learning disabilities in writing. A ten question survey was administered to a random sample of special education teachers in Ohio. Participants viewed technology as beneficial, but use and knowledge of assistive technology was limited. Reasons revealed were demands for training and resource availability and student needs. Value placed on technology, current education, and years of teaching experience did not correlate with participants feeling adequately trained to use assistive technology or have an impact on level of assistive technology integration. Possible reasons included inadequate teacher training, lack of teachers seeing student need for assistive technology, and the rate of technology change. Author:Bigelow, D. L.

Language:

English

Source:

http://www.dyslexia-project.eu/rpool/resources/+13.pdf

Name of the article:

Computer-based Training with Ortho-Phonological Units in DyslexicChildren: New Investigations.

Short content:

This study aims to show that training using a computer game incorporatingan audio-visual phoneme discrimination task with phonological units, presented simultaneously with orthographic units, might improve literacy skills. Two experiments were conducted, one in secondary schools with dyslexic children (Experiment 1) and the other in a speech-therapy clinic with individual case studies (Experiment 2). A classical pre-test, training, post-test design was used. The main findings indicated an improvement in reading scores after short intensive training (10 h) in Experiment 1 and progress in the reading and spelling scores obtained by the dyslexic children (training for 8 h) in Experiment 2. These results are discussed within the frameworks of both the speech-specific deficit theory of dyslexia and the connectionist models of reading development. Keywords: reading; spelling; word recognition; training; computer-aided learningAuthor:Ecalle, J., Magnan, J., Bouchafa, H., Gombert, E.J.

Language:

English

Source:

http://www.dyslexia-project.eu/rpool/resources/+2.pdf

Name of the article:

Computer-based multisensory learning in children with developmentaldyslexia. (2008). Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience

Short content:

Several attempts have been made to remediate developmental dyslexiausing various training environments. Based on the well-known retrieval structure model, the memory strength of phonemes and graphemes should be strengthened by visual and auditory associations between graphemes and phonemes. Using specifically designed training software, we examined whether establishing a multitude of visuo-auditory associations might help to mitigate writing errors in children with developmental dyslexia. Conclusion: Three-month of visual-auditory multimedia training strongly improved writing skills in children with developmental dyslexia and non-dyslexic children. Thus, according to the retrieval structure model, multi-sensory training using visual and auditory cues enhances writing performance in children with developmental dyslexia and non-dyslexic children. Keywords: developmental dyslexia, multisensory learning, computer- based trainingAuthor:Kast, M., Meyer, M., Vogelic, Ch., Gross, M., Jancke, L.

Language:

Source:

Name of the article:

Learning disabilities and the auditory and visual matching computer program. (2008). Support for Learning

Short content:

This study examined whether audiovisual computer training withoutlinguistic material had a remedial effect on different learning disabilities, like dyslexia and ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder). This study applied a pre- test–intervention–post-test design with students (N = 62) between theages of 7 and 19. The computer training lasted eight weeks occurring twice a week for 15 minutes per session. After the training period, an improvement in the auditory-visual matching test was found. According to the hypothesis of this study, the youngest children with dyslexia would benefit most from the intervention. However, the training had also a positive effect on auditory-visual matching with older students with dyslexia. Surprisingly, the students with ADD benefited from this intervention. According to the teachers, this intervention had also a positive effect on the students’ school behaviour. Key words: auditory and visual matching, dyslexia, ADD, intervention.Author:Tormanen, M., R., K., Takala, M., Sajaniemi, N.

Language:

English

Source:

http://www.dyslexia-project.eu/rpool/resources/+21.pdf

Name of the article:

Learning to Read Words: The Effects of Internet-Based Software on theImprovement of Reading Performance.

Short content:

Two design experiments were conducted to improve the word recognitionperformance of students at risk of school failure. In Study 1, an Internet- based software from the TELE-Web project was used to remediate the word recognition performance of 4 students at risk of retention and reading disabilities in first grade. In Study 2, the Internet-based software was used with an entire classroom of first-grade students in an effort to prevent reading difficulties and to accelerate reading performance. The results indicated that TELE-Web was effective in improving sightword recognition and that these improvements transferred to a standardized measure of reading achievement. These findings suggest the promise of Internet-based software in supporting the reading programs of young readers at risk for retention or referral.Author:Englert, C.S., Zhao, Y., Collings, N., Romig, N.

Language:

English

Source:

http://www.dyslexia-project.eu/rpool/resources/+8.pdf

Name of the article:

Supporting Struggling Writers Using Technology: Evidence-BasedInstruction and Decision-Making

Short content:

This report examines and summarizes the research base for the full range of technologies to support writing. These technologies are not meant toreplace good writing-as-process instruction. Instead, they provide scaffolding for basic writing skills, especially for students who struggle. Technological scaffolding provides a compensatory function in that it permits students to perform at higher levels of proficiency. Technology that provides such a compensatory function is called assistive technology when used by students with disabilities to enhance their functioning on writing tasks, especially when instructional or remedial approaches have failed to develop the required skills. This report provides guidance onchoosing and implementing technologies to support writing and writing instruction. It also serves as a framework for including technologies (software and devices) in www.TechMatrix.org, an online database of technologies reviewed for assistive and accessibility features maintainAuthor:George R., Peterson-Karlan, G. R., Parette, H. P.

Language:

English

Source:

http://www.dyslexia-project.eu/rpool/resources/+7.pdf

Name of the article:

The Effectiveness of Oral Expression through the use of Continuous SpeechRecognition Technology in Supporting the Written Composition ofPostsecondary Students with Learning Disabilities.

Short content:

The purpose of study was to examine the compensatory effectiveness oforal expression through the use of continuous speech recognition technology on the written composition performance of postsecondary students with learning disabilities. This writing mode was compared to a popular accommodation involving oral expression, using a human transcriber to create a verbatim transcription, and to a common visual- motor method of writing, using a keyboard without assistance. Data revealed that students with learning disabilities in the area of written expression wrote significantly higher quality essays at a faster rate using the transcription and speech recognition modes of writing than they did using the keyboarding method of writing. This study suggests that current continuous speech recognition technology can offer postsecondary students with learning disabilities a method to write that is superior to keyboarding as indicated by measures of quality and rate of production.Author:Conrad, S., R.

Language:

English

Source:

http://www.dyslexia-project.eu/rpool/resources/+15.pdf

Name of the article:

Relation of Native-Language Reading and Spelling Abilities to AttitudesToward Learning a Second Language

Short content:

he authors investigated the relation of foreign language attitudes andperceptions to reading and spelling skills for 278 English-speaking college students enrolled in 100- and 200- level foreign language classes, using the Foreign Language Attitudes and Perceptions Survey , the Test of Dyslexia- Rapid Assessment Profile, and the Woodcock–Johnson III Reading Fluency Test. Spelling, silent reading fluency, orthography, and listening vocabulary correlated modestly but significantly with foreign language attitudes and perceptions; that is, students with weaker reading and spelling scores exhibited more negative attitudes and perceptions toward foreign- language learning (p < .05). Mean difference analyses for high-, middle-, and low-risk groups (on the basis of spelling scores) revealed significant differences in attitudes (p < .05); however, the authors noted no significant differences on the basis of the language being studied. In general, the results confirm that college students withAuthor:Scott, K. W., Bell, S.M., McCallum, R. S.

Language:

English

Source:

http://www.dyslexia-project.eu/rpool/resources/+25.pdf

Name of the article:

Second Language Learning and Reading with the Additional Load ofDyslexia

Short content:

This article examines the various factors involved in these difficulties andproposes some procedures for determining whether the reading problems are primarily due to linguistic factors, sociocultural factors, or specific learning problems such as dyslexia.The discussion of linguistic factors includes a closer examination of the concept of language proficiency. Dimensions of individual differences in the ability of second language (L2) acquisition are specified. Particular emphasis is given to the role of verbal working memory in L2 acquisition and to neuropsychological aspects. A popular target for recent research has been the orthographic structure of the language, and a general assumption has been that transparent orthographies, such as Italian or Finnish, are easier for a learner to deal with than deep orthographies.Some recent large-scale comparative surveys of reading literacy have not been able to demonstrate the impact of orthographic structures, as other, more powerful explanAuthor:Lundberg, I.

Language:

English

Source:

http://www.dyslexia-project.eu/rpool/resources/+26.pdf

Name of the article:

Mathematics Anxiety in Secondary Students in England

Short content:

Whatever the changes that are made to the mathematics curriculum inEngland, there will always remain a problem with mathematics anxiety. Maths anxiety is rarely facilitative. This study examined aspects of mathematics in secondary schools and how students rated them as sources of anxiety. Over 2000 students in independent and mainstream schools in England completed a 20-item questionnaire designed toinvestigate maths anxiety levels. The same questionnaire was given to over440 dyslexic males in specialist schools within the same age range. The results showed that examinations and tests create high levels of anxiety in approximately 4% of students. The results suggest that certain aspects and topics in the maths curriculum, such as long division, cause similar levels of anxiety for students in all year groups in secondary schools.Keywords: maths anxiety; dyscalculia; dyslexia; maths learning difficulties; testanxiety; mental arithmeticAuthor:Chinn, S.

Language:

English

Source:

http://www.dyslexia-project.eu/rpool/resources/+9.pdf

Name of the article:

Visual-Sequential and Visuo-Spatial Skills in Dyslexia: Variations Accordingto Language Comprehension and Mathematics Skills

Short content:

This study focused on visual-sequential and visuo-spatial functions in agroup of 39 heavily dyslexic children, compared to a Control group. Mean age was 12.72 (SD 1.71). The dyslexia group was divided into threesubgroups by language comprehension and mathematics skills. Only on a visual-sequential task was no difference seen between the groups. The main differences occurred between the two dyslexic subgroups with no language comprehension impairment, but with varying mathematics skills. Whereas the subgroup with good mathematics skills scored within the upper ranges, the mathematics-impaired subgroup showed significantly lower scores. The third dyslexic subgroup, with both language comprehension and mathematics impairments, performed within thenorm. The study indicates a dissociation between language comprehensionand visuospatial skills in dyslexia, which has implications for how variations in dyslexia should be understood.Author:Turid, H., Arve, A.

Language:

English

Source:

http://www.dyslexia-project.eu/rpool/resources/+10.pdf

Name of the article:

Mathematics and Dyslexia - An Overlooked Connection

Short content:

This paper describes various kinds of learning disability. It is suggested thatthe connection between mathematical difficulties and dyslexia has been largely overlooked by educators. Students’ failure to understand how the number system works and the resultant failure to appreciate place values account for many of the mathematical difficulties experienced by dyslexic learners. Keywords: dyscalculia; dyslexia; mathematics; place value; teaching strategyAuthor:Malmer, G.

Language:

English

Source:

http://www.dyslexia-project.eu/rpool/resources/+14.pdf

Name of the article:

Understanding words, understanding numbers: An exploration of themathematical profiles of poor comprehenders

Short content:

This study aimed to explore the mathematical profiles of poorcomprehenders. Given that language impairment is associated with difficulties with mathematics, and that poor comprehenders tend to have oral language weaknesses, we hypothesized that poor comprehenders would show relative weaknesses in aspects of mathematical performance.From a sample of 109 children aged 7-8 years, we selected 14 poor comprehenders and 14 controls with age-appropriate reading comprehension ability. Comparison of the performance of the group of poor comprehenders with that of the matched controls on two standardized measures of mathematical ability, one measuring procedural arithmetic prowess and the other tapping higher-level mathematical reasoning.Although there were no group differences in performance onthe arithmetic measure, the poor comprehenders showed significantly lower scores than the controls on the mathematical reasoning task.Author:Pimperton, H., Nation, K.

Language:

English

Source:

http://www.dyslexia-project.eu/rpool/resources/+17.pdf

Name of the article:

The Dyslexic Student and Mathematics in Higher Education

Short content:

Difficulties that are encountered by dyslexic undergraduates with theirlearning and understanding of mathematics are explored. Specific consideration is given to issues arising through mathematical content, its delivery, the procedures and processes of ‘doing’ mathematics, and its assessment. Particular difficulties, which have emerged through exploratory and explanatory multiple-case studies, and witnessed through the provision of one-to-one support to a dyslexic and dyspraxic engineering undergraduate, are detailed. Recommendations for the provision of mathematical support to dyslexic students and proposals for future research are given.Author:Perkin, G., Croft, T.

Language:

English

Source:

http://www.dyslexia-project.eu/rpool/resources/+19.pdf

Name of the article:

Dyslexia and learning computer programming

Short content:

This paper explores some of the issues associated with teaching computerscience to students with dyslexia. Issues associated with both student learning generally and computer science specifically are considered. The accessibility of teaching materials made available through virtual learning environments (VLEs) is addressed. Twelve resulting guidelines particularly relevant to students with dyslexia are outlined. More specifically to computer science, the issues associated with programming are explored through the development of a mapping of the features of dyslexia to the tasks involved in writing a computer program. Preliminary evidence, from both the wider dyslexia community with computer programming experience and some early interview results, are presented to both support the mapping and draw out other important issues.Keywords: dyslexia; computer programming; virtual learning environmentsAuthor:Powell, N., Moore, D., Gray, J., Finlay, J., Reaney, J.

Language:

English

Source:

http://www.dyslexia-project.eu/rpool/resources/+12.pdf

Name of the article:

Complex Imitation of Gestures in School-Aged Children with LearningDifficulties.

Short content:

The aim of this article, therefore, was to draw attention to this problemand prove how teachers of different subjects can easily recognize pupils with DCD. Prompt recognition enables fast intervention, resulting in progress in the movement abilities of pupils with DCD. Our research has shown that we can discriminate between pupils with learning difficulties and those without them on the basis of 20 tasks of the Bergès-Lézines Test of Imitation of Gestures. In particular, we wish to emphasize three tasks (72, 17, and 20) in which pupils had to cross the vertical midline of the body. Individuals with DCD face problems in spatial orientation and in complex imitation of gestures. Pupils classified into two groups (with andwithout motor coordination and learning difficulties) based on differences found in tasks requiring them to cross the vertical midline of the body and rotate their hands. Learning difficulties can be predicted by pupils performance doing such specific tasks.Author:Ozbic, M., Filipcic, T.

Language:

English

Source:

http://www.dyslexia-project.eu/rpool/resources/+18.pdf

Name of the article:

Understanding words, understanding numbers: An exploration of themathematical profiles of poor comprehenders. (2010)

Short content:

This study aimed to explore the mathematical profiles of poorcomprehenders. Given that language impairment is associated with difficulties with mathematics, and that poor comprehenders tend to have oral language weaknesses, we hypothesized that poor comprehenders would show relative weaknesses in aspects of mathematical performance.From a sample of 109 children aged 7-8 years, we selected 14 poor comprehenders and 14 controls with age-appropriate reading comprehension ability. Comparison of the performance of the group of poor comprehenders with that of the matched controls on two standardized measures of mathematical ability, one measuring procedural arithmetic prowess and the other tapping higher-level mathematical reasoning.Although there were no group differences in performance onthe arithmetic measure, the poor comprehenders showed significantly lower scores than the controls on the mathematical reasoning task.Author:Pimperton, H., Nation, K.

Language:

English

Source:

http://www.dyslexia-project.eu/rpool/resources/+17_1.pdf

Name of the article:

Visual-Sequential and Visuo-Spatial Skills in Dyslexia: Variations Accordingto Language Comprehension and Mathematics Skills

Short content:

This study focused on visual-sequential and visuo-spatial functions in agroup of 39 heavily dyslexic children, compared to a Control group. Mean age was 12.72 (SD 1.71). The dyslexia group was divided into three subgroups by language comprehension and mathematics skills. Only on a visual-sequential task was no difference seen between the groups. The main differences occurred between the two dyslexic subgroups with no language comprehension impairment, but with varying mathematics skills. Whereas the subgroup with good mathematics skills scored within the upper ranges, the mathematics-impaired subgroup showed significantly lower scores. The third dyslexic subgroup, with both language comprehension and mathematics impairments, performed within thenorm. The study indicates a dissociation between language comprehension and visuospatial skills in dyslexia, which has implications for how variations in dyslexia should be understood.Author:Turid, H., Arve, A.

Language:

English

Source:

http://www.dyslexia-project.eu/rpool/resources/+10_1.pdf

Name of the article:

The Dyslexic Student and Mathematics in Higher Education

Short content:

Difficulties that are encountered by dyslexic undergraduates with theirlearning and understanding of mathematics are explored. Specific consideration is given to issues arising through mathematical content, its delivery, the procedures and processes of ‘doing’ mathematics, and its assessment. Particular difficulties, which have emerged through exploratory and explanatory multiple-case studies, and witnessed through the provision of one-to-one support to a dyslexic and dyspraxic engineering undergraduate, are detailed. Recommendations for the provision of mathematical support to dyslexic students and proposals for future research are given.Author:Perkin, G., Croft, T.

Language:

English

Source:

http://www.dyslexia-project.eu/rpool/resources/+19_1.pdf

Name of the article:

Critical review of reading models and theories in first and secondlanguages

Short content:

Reading models have been much discussed by researchers and languagepractitioners to explain the cognitive processes which occur in a readers mind. Because reading is a silent and internal process, much is left unknown in this paper, the writer attempts to critically discuss the different views of reading processes, from the perspectives of first language (L1) and second language (L2). These views are modelled into two classes, the process and componential models, and further divided into three type, the bottom-up, top-sown and interactive models. Further discussion of L2 reading is also provided in the light of whether L2 reading is a language or reading problem. To provide further insights into the cognitive processes of a reader, two types of hypotheses commonly used to explain the complexities incolved in L2 reading are reviewed, the language interdependece hypothesis and the language threshold hypothesis.Author:Zaidah Zainal

Language:

English

Source:

http://www.dyslexia-project.eu/rpool/resources/Zaidah_Zainal_Critical%20review%20of%20rea ding%20models.pdf

Name of the article:

A Short Analysis of the Nature of Reading

Short content:

This paper gives a short analysis of the nature of reading. Though it isgenerally believed that reading involves perceiving the written form of language, the term reading has not been clearly defined up to date. It is possible to see reading as a process, or to examine the product of that process. Three reading models, namely Bottom-up Model, Top-down Model and Interactive Model, are discussed in this paper. Author:Feng Liu

Language:

English

Source:

http://www.dyslexia- project.eu/rpool/resources/Feng_Liu_short_analysis_nature_reading.pdf

Name of the article:

On advantage of seeing TEXT and hearing SPEECH

Short content:

The aim of this study was to examine the effect of congruence betweenthe sensory modality through which a concept can be experienced and the modality through which the word denoting that concept is perceived during word recognition. Words denoting concepts that can be experienced visually (e.g. “color”) and words denoting concepts that can be experienced auditorily (e.g. “noise”) were presented both visually and auditorily. We observed shorter processing latencies when there was a match between the modality through which a concept could be experienced and the modality through which a word denoting thatconcept was presented. In visual lexical decision task, “color” was recognized faster than “noise”, whereas in auditory lexical decision task, “noise” was recognized faster than “color”. The obtained pattern